• Anna Ivanova

Injectable, Porous, and Cell-Responsive Gelatin Cryogels


The article, Injectable, porous, and cell-responsive gelatin cryogels by Koshy et al., discusses the creation of cell-adhesive and degradable gelatin scaffolds that could be injected through a conventional needle while maintaining a predefined geometry and architecture. Complications associated with the surgical implants may impair the output of biomaterials-based therapies, motivating the production of materials systems that enable minimally invasive incorporation into the host. The scaffolds developed by cryopolymerization of GelM

A (cryoGelMA) are mentioned in this article. The study examined the mechanical properties, structure, and degradation of cryoGelMA gels, as well as their ability to aid cell attachment, proliferation, and survival. Eventually, gelatin cryogels were tested in vivo for their ability to deliver a chemoattractant protein locally, recruit host cells, and undergo cell-mediated degradation.

It was suggested that using a material with inherent cell-responsive elements could help cryogel implants perform better by enabling direct cell attachment and local remodelling. Gelatin, which is made from collagen, has built-in peptide sequences that aid enzymatic degradation and cell adhesion.

Gelatin is an appealing implantable biomaterial because of its low cost, lack of immunogenicity, and long track record of protection in medicine. The addition of pendant methacrylate groups to gelatin (GelMA) allows for the formation of crosslinked hydrogels through free radical polymerization.

The findings show that defined-shape porous cryoGelMA gels can be injected through a traditional needle and regain their geometry and architecture after being ejected from the needle bore. This is due to the thin-walled and highly porous structure of the gels. CryoGelMA can be degraded by MMPs, is capable of controlled release of proteins, and allows cell trafficking within its interconnected pores. These attractive properties position cryoGelMA as a platform for cell-triggered scaffold remodelling and protein release for applications in biomaterials-based therapy.


Reference:

Koshy, S. T., Ferrante, T. C., Lewin, S. A., & Mooney, D. J. (2014b). Injectable, porous, and cell-responsive gelatin cryogels. Biomaterials, 35(8), 2477–2487. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2013.11.044





2 views0 comments